Body Shaming By Playboy Model Dani Mathers Is Insecure AF

This has to be the only explanation why this woman would resort to body shaming.

Still, it’s no excuse.

I read yesterday on Revelist.com that Dani Mathers, the Playboy Playmate of the Year last year, reportedly took a photo of a naked woman in her gym’s locker room and then shared it on SnapChat. She said: “If I can’t I unsee this then you can’t either,” according to The Daily Mail.

WTF?

As Revelist.com said, you would think that someone who models naked would celebrate the human form — but apparently she has ideas about what types of human bodies she wants to see.

Not to mention, this woman was in a women’s locker room in a gym. While not completely private, I would argue there’s an unspoken agreement about any locker room that makes it clear that it’s not a public space — as in, you have no right to take photos of other people there!

It’s my opinion that any woman who has to tear down other women and make fun of someone else’s appearance must be insanely insecure. Because she is so unhappy or worried about her own appearance, she makes fun of others to make herself feel better.

I would’ve thought this 29-year-old would’ve left this kind of immature behavior behind in high school. But even then it’s unacceptable.

After enjoying a lunch with girlfriends yesterday during which we all stated how much we loved Jennifer Aniston’s article on HuffingtonPost.com that lamented society’s pressure on women to look a certain way, it was disheartening to hear of a woman treating another woman this way.

In her reply to the SnapChat leak, Mathers says: “I chose to do what I do for a living because I love the female body and I know body shaming is wrong.”

Then she goes on to say she thought the SnapChat was a private one between herself and a friend.

As if that makes it OK.

As Revelist.com says: “if she says she’s ‘not about’ body shaming, then why is she still sending people inappropriate (and violating) pictures like that, even privately?”

Preach!

It infuriates me when women make derogatory comments about other women — we still have to fight for equality in so many ways these days, why would we want to make it more difficult for one another to be ourselves, to be happy in our own skin?

Adobe Spark (2)

Sometimes the things we do and say in jest, as a joke, says more about ourselves than anything else. It shows a person’s insecurities and true character.

I would hope that more women can share sentiments like Aniston did, someone who from the outside may seem to have everything that society deems is what a woman should have — a thin body, beauty, talent. Still, she expressed feeling pressure to fit into society’s idea of what women are “supposed” to look like. (She also had some badass comments about society’s other expectations for marriage and motherhood — seriously, read this article!)

Angela George

via wiki: Angela George

Aniston said: “We get to decide for ourselves what is beautiful when it comes to our bodies. That decision is ours and ours alone. Let’s make that decision for ourselves and for the young women in this world who look to us as examples.”

Let’s pay attention and heed the words of women like Aniston.

Women who hate on other women should be ashamed, and they should spend some time thinking about what it is they don’t like about themselves that causes them to treat other women badly.

1 Comment on Body Shaming By Playboy Model Dani Mathers Is Insecure AF

  1. Jane
    July 15, 2016 at 9:18 am (5 months ago)

    When I read what Dani Mathers had done, I was transported back to the locker room of the 8th grade. Fortunately, in those days we did not have the easy camera access of today. My heart broke for the woman in the photo and I can only imagine how she is feeling. I do think Miss Mathers needs to face some sort of punishment over this incident. Her “apology” sounded much like that of someone who is only sorry that they got caught. I hope we as woman can learn from Jennifer Anniston and yes, this incident as well and learn to come together as woman in a supportive way. I look back on the 8th grade bullies and realize now how insecure and unhappy they were. I feel more pity for Miss Mathers than anger. In some ways, she is still stuck in the 8th grade.

    Reply

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